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Posted By The Bower Inn

Calling all Georges and their dragons!

We're celebrating St George's Day with a difference this year (2016).


We're inviting anyone called George to come to the pub on Friday, April 22nd, the day before St George's Day, in a bid to have as many people with the same name as possible in one place at one time.


Men or women who have the first name of George are being invited to the pub anytime during opening hours on Friday, April 22nd, and if they bring proof of their name with a photograph, such as a passport or picture driving licence, we will give them a free glass of prosecco on the house.


Those Georges who bring in a dragon as well will be entered into a draw to win a bottle of bubbly, which the winner will be invited to come back and collect on St George's Day.


We hope by keeping the details of all the Georges who attend during the day we will be able to apply for an entry into the Guinness Book of Records. The entry being for the largest number of people named George in one place on the same day.


St George is the patron saint of England and legend has it he was responsible for slaying a dragon.


Historians claim St George was a Roman colonel who was martyred when he defended Christians persecuted by the Romans during the reign of the Emperor Diocletian (245-313).


The legends surrounding St George vary. One of them concerns the famous dragon. A pagan town in Libya was being terrorised by a dragon. The residents threw it sheep to keep it at bay but it did not go away.


Then a princess was offered to the beast, but St George came along, killed the dragon and rescued the lady. As a result the townsfolk converted to Christianity.


The origin of the legend came from the Greek Church, which honoured George. They venerated him as a soldier and told many stories of his bravery in battle.


The western Christians, joining with the Byzantine Christians in the Crusades, misinterpreted the Greek traditions. The story we know today of St George and the dragon dates from the 14th century.


Modern day Georges and their dragons will be able to celebrate the legend when they join us here on Friday, April 22nd.


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